Tag Archives: Housing bubble

The Housing Market Goes Down The Drain

The Denver Post published an article last week titled, “Major cold front slams Denver housing market in September” (note, weather-wise, September was one of the warmest and driest in many years). Single-family home sales in September plunged 30.5% from August and 21.7% from September 2017. Condo sales fell off a cliff, dropping 43% from August and 17.3% from August 2017. Normally inventory drops slightly in September. This year inventory in September soared. The median price of homes sold fell 3.8%. The article said the high-end of the market – homes worth over $1 million – fell 44.4% from August to September.

In terms of economic trends, Denver historically has been representative of the same
economic and demographic trends nationwide. Based on subscriber emails and articles I’ve read from around the country, the activity in the housing market nationwide is similar to Denver’s.

New home sales for August, which were released last week, showed another year-over-year decline on a SAAR basis and missed the Street’s expectations. In addition, the 627,000 SAAR print for July was revised down 3% from 627,000 to 608,000. Revisions for June and July together were taken down by 39,000. The fact that new homebuilders are sitting on a near-record level of inventory (measured both by value and units) contradicts the NAR’s contention that home sales are declining because of a lack of affordable inventory. Recent results from lower-end, lower-priced homes (Beazer, DR Horton and Pulte) show demand for “affordable” homes is waning.

One indicator supporting my view is the response of KBH’s stock after it reported earnings on September 25th . The past several quarters KBH stock staged a multi-day rally after it reported earnings.  Although KBH reported a revenue and net income “beat” and spiked up at the open the next day, the stock closed down 3% from Tuesday’s close.  KBH’s stock closed 5.8% lower on the week.

While KBH’s revenues, operation income and units delivered showed impressive gains over the same quarter last year, its new orders showed very little growth and the value of the new orders declined year-over-year for the quarter. Furthermore, the Company’s order cancellation rate increased to 26% from 25% in the year earlier quarter. While KBH’s income statement looks impressive in the “rear-view” mirror, the operating statistics that give us insight into future quarters are showing a definitive slow-down.

KBH is trading at a 14x P/E ratio. Historically, homebuilders trade with a 5-8x P/E when they actually manage to generate “E.” I believe it’s safe to assume that KBH’s earnings will decline for at least the next several quarters. This means that KBH’s stock price will drop from both lower earnings and P/E ratio compression. In fact, I believe this will occur with all the homebuilder stocks.

KBH stock is down 37% from high in mid-January this year. I believe over the next 12-24 months, the stock price will be at least cut in half.

The commentary above is an excerpt from the latest Short Seller’s Journal. My subscribers and I have made easy money shorting KBH and other homebuilders. This week I feature a little-known homebuilder and explain why its disclosure last week shoots a hole in the National Association of Realtors’ propaganda that the falling home sales is attributable to low inventory. I also feature two other great short ideas – one in retail and one in auto finance. You can learn more about this newsletter here:   Short Seller’s Journal information.

Fundamentals Supporting Stock Market Further Deteriorate

The Bureau of Economic Analysis calculates and publishes an earnings metric known as the National Income and Products Accounts which presents the value and composition of national output and the types of incomes generated in its production. One of the NIPA accounts is “corporate profits.” From the NIPA handbook: “Corporate profits represents the portion of the total income earned from current production that is accounted for by U.S. corporations.”

The BEA’s measurement of corporate profits is somewhat similar to using operating income from GAAP financial statements rather than net income. The BEA is attempting to isolate “profits from current production” from non-production noised introduced by GAAP accounting standards. “Profits from current production provide a comprehensive and consistent economic measure of the net income earned by all U.S. corporations. As such, it is unaffected by the changes in tax laws, and it is adjusted for non-reported and misreported income” (emphasis is mine).

Why do I bring this up – what is the punch line? Because the NIPA measurement of corporate profits is currently showing no growth. Contrast this with the net income “growth” that is generate from share buybacks, GAAP tax rate reductions and other non-cash GAAP gimmicks used to generate GAAP net income on financial statements. This does not surprise me because I use operating income when judging whether or not companies that are reported as “beating” estimates are “beating” with accounting gimmicks or actual products derived from the underlying business.

It’s quite easy for companies to manufacture net income “beats.” But it’s more difficult – though possible – to manipulate operating income. The deferment of expenses via capitalizing them (taking a current cost incurred and sticking it on the balance sheet where the cost is amortized as an expense over time) is one trick to manage operating income because expense capitalization reduces the quarterly GAAP expense that is connected to that particular expenditure (capex, interest, etc).

The point here is that corporate operating profits – or “profits from production” per the BEA – are not growing despite the propaganda from Wall Street and the President that the economy is “booming.” Furthermore, if we were to adjust the BEA numbers by a true inflation number, the resulting calculation would show that “real” (net of price inflation) corporate profits have been declining. Using this measure of corporate profitability as one of the measures of economic health, the economy is not doing well.

August Auto Sales – August auto sales reported the first week of September showed, on a SAAR (Seasonally Adjusted Annualized Rate basis), a slight decline from the July SAAR. The positive spin on the numbers was that the SAAR was 0.4% percent above August 2017. However, recall that all economic activity was negatively affected by the two huge hurricanes that hit south Texas and Florida. The SAAR for this August was reported at 16.5 million. This is 11.2% below the record SAAR of 18.6 million in October 2017. It was noted by LMC Automotive, an auto industry consulting firm, that “retail demand is deteriorating” (“retail” is differentiated from “fleet” sales). Sedan sales continue to plummet, offset partially by a continued demand for pick-up trucks and SUVs.

Casting aside the statistically manipulated SAAR, the industry itself per Automotive News reported 1.481 million vehicles sold in August, a number which is 0.2% below August 2017. In other words, despite the hurricane-depressed sales in August 2017, automobile manufacturers are reporting a year over year decline in sales for August. This was lead by a stunning 12.7% drop in sales at GM. I’ll note that GM no longer reports monthly sales (only quarterly). But apparently an insider at GM fed that number to Bloomberg News.  Automotive News asterisks the number as “an estimate.” Apparently GM pulled back on incentives. On a separate note, I’m wondering what will happen to consumer discretionary spending if the price of gasoline continues to move higher. It now costs me about 35% more a year ago to fill the tank in my car.

The commentary above is an excerpt from the latest Short Seller’s Journal.  I  recommended shorting GM at $42 in an early November 2017 issue of the Short Seller’s Journal. It hit $34 earlier this past week. That’s a 19% ROR over the time period. In the last issue of the Short Short Seller’s Journal, I recommended shorting Wayfair (W) at $149.92, last Friday’s close. W is down $3.50 – or 2.3% – despite the rising stock market. My recommendation include put option ideas You can learn more about this newsletter here:  Short Seller’s Journal Information

A Coming Flood Of Treasuries And An Epic Gold Rally?

“When it starts to happen, I think it could happen a lot more quickly than people realize.” The rest of the world is methodically “weaning” itself off its dependence on the U.S. dollar. Perhaps the latest EM collapse will accelerate this reset. At the same time, the U.S. Government is on track to issue a record amount of Treasury bonds to fund its rapidly expanding spending deficit. Who is going to buy these Treasuries? When the bid for Treasuries disappears, the dollar will begin to collapse, gold will soar. Demand will far exceed supply as the price rises and the paper gold shorts will be slaughtered.

My colleague Chris Marcus invited me on to his Miles Franklin podcast to discuss what appears to be an extreme version of the 2008 de facto financial system collapse and a likely “reset” of the global monetary system:

In the next issue of the Mining Stock Journal, I analyze the latest COT report and present the price-point at which hedge funds will start to cover their large short position.  I also update my favorite junior mining stock ideas and present my favorite shorter term trading plays. You can learn more about this here:   Mining Stock Journal information.

Bad News For The Housing Market Continues To Pile Up

I remember vividly the scene in The Big Short when a housing broker was driving the “Steve Eisman” group around California’s “Inland Empire.”  Home prices were dropping and the vista was littered with “for sale” signs.  The broker remarked awkwardly, “the market is going through small valley right now.”  Successful realtors can look anyone in the eyes and present a small nuclear bomb as a box of Godiva chocolates.

The National Association of Realtors’ chief “economist,” Larry Yun, has been pleading for more than a year that declining existing home sales is caused by low inventory. But this is mere propaganda.  I’ve presented a chart more than once on this site from the Fed’s database (FRED) which shows that sales volume and inventory is inversely correlated.

Redfin released its”Housing Demand Index” through June on August 1st. It fell nearly 1% from May and was 9.6% lower in June 2018 than 2017. The number of people requesting tours fell 6.1% compared to June 2017 and 15% fewer made offers on homes. This is despite noting that inventory levels surged in the hottest markets in which RDFN operates. This index is representative of demographic trends nationwide, as RDFN operates in the largest metropolitan areas outside of New York City. The Index covers 15 metropolitan areas.

Demand is falling because pool of potential homebuyers who can qualify for one of the Government’s subprime mortgage programs has dried up like Lake Mead. This was evident in this week’s existing and new home sales reports, both of which showed home sales falling month to month and year over year. Both numbers were well below the expectations of Wall Street’s brain trust. Existing home inventory on an outright basis (not the highly massaged “months supply” basis) is 9% above the average inventory level in 2015 and 31% above the outright inventory for 2017. New home sales dropped “unexpectedly” from June to July despite the fact that June’s original headline report was revised lower. New home sales according to the Census Bureau have declined 3 out of the last 4 months.

The Dow Jones Home Construction Index is down 22.6% since mid-January. Some homebuilder stocks are down over 30% since then. The homebuilder stocks are in a bear market based on the “20%” decree. This is a fact that is not reported at all in the mainstream media. The homebuilder stocks peaked in July 2005 and were in a tail-spin well before it became obvious to all that the mid-2000’s bubble had popped. I doubt it will take 18-24 months from January 2018 before it becomes apparent to most that the housing market is in trouble.

My subscribers and I have been raking in easy money shorting the homebuilder stocks. I will be updating the my short ideas – including ideas for using puts – in Sunday’s issue after TOL’s numbers triggered a one-day spike up in the DJUSHB. I’ll also be updating the Tesla saga. You can learn more about this newsletter service here:  Short Seller’s Journal information.

More Evidence The Economy Is Deteriorating

“Financial-market and economic prospects remain far shy of the hype and headlines, amidst tanking consumer optimism and negative revisions to recent reporting.” – John Williams, Shadowstats.com

The economy may seem like it’s doing well if you are part of the upper 10% demographic. Though, in reality, for most of the upper 10%, doing “well” has been a function of having easy access to credit. NASA Federal Credit Union is offering 0% down, 0% mortgage insurance for mortgages up to $2.5 million.

Someone I know suggested the tax cut stimulus had run its course. But the narrative that the tax cuts would stimulate economic activity was pure propaganda. The tax cuts stimulated $1 trillion in expected share buybacks and put more money in the pockets of corporate insiders and billionaires. The average middle class household spent its tax cut money on more expensive gasoline and food. Since the tax cut took effect, auto sales and home sales have declined. Retail sales have been mixed. However, it’s difficult to distinguish between statistical manipulation and inflation. I would argue that, net of real inflation and Census Bureau statistical games, real retail sales have been declining.

As an example, last week Black Box Intelligence released July restaurant sales. While comparable store sales were up 0.54% over July 2017, comparable restaurant traffic was down 1.8%. On a rolling three months, comp sales are up 0.46% but comparable traffic is down nearly 2%. With traffic declining, especially a faster rate relative to the small increase in sales, it means the sales “growth” is entirely a function of price inflation. If Black Box Intelligence could control it’s data for price increases, it would show that there is no question that real sales are declining. I have been loathe to recommend shorting restaurant stocks because, for some reason, the hedge funds love them.

On Wednesday last week, the Government reported July retail sales, which were “up” 0.5% vs June. However, June’s 0.5% “gain” was revised sharply lower to 0.2%. Revising the previous month lower to make the headline number for the reported month appear higher is a mathematical gimmick that the Government uses frequently. As an example of the questionable quality of the retail sales report, the Government reports that sales at motor-vehicle and parts dealers rose 0.2% from June to July. But the auto industry itself reported a 4% decline in sales from June to July. I’ll leave it up to you to decide which report is more reliable…

Housing starts for July, reported last Thursday, showed an 8% decline from June’s number. June’s number was revised lower from the original number reported. No surprise there, at least for me. The report missed the Wall Street brain trust’s expectations by a wide margin for the second month in row. The downward revision to June makes the report even worse. Additionally, housing starts are now down year-over-year for the second month in a row.

This report followed last Wednesday’s mortgage applications report which showed a decline in purchase applications for the 5th week in a row. The housing starts number continues to throw cold water on the “low inventory” narrative. While there still may some areas of housing market strength in the $500,000 and below price bucket, the mortgage purchase applications data has been mostly negative since April, which reflects deteriorating home sales. This reality is “magnified” by the fact that home sales have declining during what should be the strongest seasonal period of the year for home sales.

Lending Tree, Zillow Group and Redfin are “derivatives” of housing market activity. They reflect web searches, foot traffic and sales associated with mortgages and home sales. Lending Tree stock is down nearly 42% late January. Zillow stock is down 26% since mid-June. Redfin is down 39.5% since the beginning of the year, including an 18.5% plunge two weeks ago. unequivocally, these three stocks reflect the popping of the housing bubble. The Short Seller Journal recommended shorting all three of these stocks before their big declines.

Normally I’m hesitant to discuss the regional Fed economic surveys because they are skewed by their expectations/outlook (hope/sentiment) components. However, the Philly Fed survey for August was notable because it reinforced my view that the economy and the “hope” for a better economy is fading quickly. The overall index crashed to 11.9 from 25.7 in July. This is lower than just before the Trump election, when “hope” soared. Wall Street was expecting a 22.5 reading on the index. The new orders, work week and employment components plunged. Shipments dropped, inventories rose and prices paid fell. This report reflects the view that economy is much weaker than is conveyed by the political propaganda coming form DC.

I don’t know what it will take to cause a plunge in the Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq but, as we’ve seen with homebuilder stocks, there’s a lot of opportunity to make money on economic reality in the lesser-followed sectors of the stock market.

Myself and my Short Seller’s Journal subscribers have been raking in easy money shorting the homebuilder sector and, of late, Tesla.  I’ve been including detailed analysis of Tesla, why it will likely be out of business within 2 years and ideas for using puts to short the stock.  You can learn more about this newsletter here:  Short Seller’s Journal information.

That egomaniac [Elon Musk] just paid for my new landscaping. LOL! Cashed in on some Jan 2019 100 & 200 puts for a 175% gain. Should be interesting to see how and how long this debacle plays on. – subscriber feedback.

Housing Heads South – Precious Metals Getting Ready To Soar

“We’re now forecasting slower revenue growth for the third quarter based on an unexpected drop in Redfin’s bookings growth in the past three weeks, slowing traffic growth in a weakening real estate market.” – CEO of Redfin (RDFN) on the earnings conference call. Redfin stock plunged 22% after it reported its latest quarter this past Thursday after the market closed. I’ve been recommending RDFN as a short for several months in my Short Seller’s Journal.

I joined Elijah Johnson and Eric Dubin on SD Bullion’s weekly Metals & Markets podcast  to discuss the popping housing market bubble and to explain why the risk of missing a big move higher in the precious metals market is much greater than the risk of more downside from here:

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I just released my latest issue of the Short Seller’s Journal in which I explain why Tesla’s days may be numbered and I offer ideas for speculating that TSLA goes to zero sometime in the next two years. I also update my homebuilder short-sell ideas. You can learn more about this newsletter here:  Short Seller’s Journal information

Wash, Rinse, Repeat: The Big Short Mortgages Are Back

This almost makes me wonder if Angelo Mozilo is running NASA Federal Credit Union.

A Short Seller’s Journal subscriber heard an ad for this mortgage product on his local radio in Atlanta. NASA Federal Credit Union is offering 0% down payment, 0% PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance. “This is unique because conventional lenders will normally require PMI when your down payment is less than 20% of the home purchase price. So, if that down payment was keeping you from getting into your new home, talk to a mortgage loan professional at NASA Federal!”

Fast closing guaranteed. If you don’t close by the contract data, NASA Federal will give you $1000 toward closing costs. Jumbo Mortgages are included in this offering.

The only thing guaranteed about this product is that a large percentage of the borrowers will eventually default.  With 0% down, the borrower is going to be underwater by at least 10% after all closing costs are factored into the equation.

What could possibly go wrong?  Lending Tree stock, which reflects loan demand, primarily from potential homebuyers shopping online for mortgages, is down 42% since early February:

Lending Tree reported that mortgage products revenue fell 9% from Q1 and 6% from a year ago when it reported its earnings yesterday. Easy-money mortgages offered by the Government have fueled home price inflation. TREE’s numbers tell us that mortgage activity is rapidly declining, which means that homebuyer demand is declining. NASA Federal is offering a subprime product at the top of the market in a desperate attempt to stimulate its mortgage underwriting fees. I can only wonder if the proprietors are counting on another Taxpayer bailout of the banks this time around…

I presented Lending Tree as a short idea to my Short Seller Journal subscribers in early June at $260. In the next issue I’ll update my view on TREE and how to play it with put and call options. One subscriber emailed me yesterday to report that he shorted August $300 calls for $2.92 when I suggested the idea in June and covered them for a dime. You can learn more about this newsletter service here:  Short Seller’s Journal information.

The Q2 GDP Farce, The Big Short 2.0 And Gold

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) released its “advance” estimate of Q2 GDP on Friday. The Government would have us believe that the U.S. economic growth accelerated to a 4.1 annualized growth rate in Q2. Other than the fact that a one-time jump in soybean exports ahead of the trade war contributed to 25% of the alleged 4.1% growth, nothing about the report is credible. (excerpt from the latest issue of the  Short Seller’s Journal)

Total home sales in SoCal were down over 11% year over year in June (as reported by the California Association of Realtors).   With housing, as goes SoCal, so goes the rest of the nation.  The homebuilders are the short seller’s gift that keeps on giving.

Silver Doctors invited me on the Weekly Metals & Markets podcast to discuss the GDP report, the housing market and gold:

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I just released my weekly issue of the Short Seller’s Journal. In this issue I present more stunning housing market collapse data, I discuss AMZN’s latest earnings report and I talk about Steve “The Big Short” Eisman’s latest short position, which has been one of my SSJ recommendations for a several months.  You can learn more about this newsletter service here:  Short Seller’s Journal information.

Adios Housing Bubble

The homebuilder and related stocks are in an “official” bear market.  For a short-seller it’s the perfect scenario, as the decline in homebuilder stocks has received little to no attention from the mainstream financial media.  The current bubble is a “price bubble” that was fueled by the $2.5 trillion of printed money dumped into the housing market by the Fed and de facto subprime mortgages underwritten by the Government (Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, FHA, VHA, USDA).

Prices are beginning to fall in many markets and inventory is rapidly increasing.  Many of the new listings are flippers who soon will become desperate to unload.  This is how the mid-2000’s market collapse was triggered.

Meanwhile, the housing market stocks began to collapse in mid-2005 – an omen ignored most.  It would appear that history will once again repeat.  And the homebuilders have a long way still to fall:

My Short Seller Journal subscribers and I are making easy money shorting the homebuilder stocks. I called Hovnanian at the beginning of the year at $2.88. It’s currently trading at $1.53. The homebuilder stocks provide opportunities for profitable short term trades plus positioning for long term short-sell “investing.” In last week’s issue I discussed a strategy for navigating yesterday’s earnings reports for DHI, PHM and BZH. We are already making money on these ideas. You can learn more about this newsletter service here:  Short Seller’s Journal information.

Home Sales Data Show The Bubble Is Bursting

There’s no question in my mind now that the housing “snowball” has started downhill and it won’t take long to develop into an avalanche. In addition to all of the “for sale” and “for rent” signs I’m seeing with my own eyes popping up around Denver, I’ve been receiving emails from subscribers describing the same thing in their area.Short Seller’s Journal, July 22nd issue

The existing and new home sales reports this week were worse than even I expected.  Given the statistical manipulation tools used by the National Association of Realtors (existing home sales) and the Census Bureau (new home sales) – both entities use the same regression software – one can only wonder about the true rate of home sales decline.

Yesterday, CNBC.com featured a report titled, Southern California home sales crash, a warning sign to the nation.  I was surprised to see CNBC issue a bearish report on anything.  This report is similar to what’s occurring in New York City – rising inventory and falling sales.  Apartment rents in NYC are also dropping.  It’s similar in nearly all “bellwether” markets.

The Housing Bubble Blog (thehousingbubble.com), which was around during the mid-2000’s housing bubble, posted an article on Friday titled, “Discount sales can create a snowball effect.” The article featured articles from different cities, Portland, Dallas, Ft Collins (Colorado) and Minnapolis/St Paul which described rising inventory and falling prices.

This explains why the homebuilder stocks are in an official “bear market,” with some homebuilder stocks down over 30% since late January. I have yet to hear or read about this fact from the mainstream financial media or Wall Street.

Today’s new home sales report, along with the serial decline in the housing starts  data, disproves the “low inventory” narrative.  Affordability, rising rates and a shrinking pool of potential homebuyers who can qualify for a conforming mortgage has torpedoed demand.  The latest U of Michigan Consumer Sentiment report featured this chart on homebuying sentiment:


As you can see, the consumer “sentiment” toward buying a home is at its lowest reading since 2008. This is not a fact that would ever show up in the mainstream financial reporting on the housing market.

As for the low inventory narrative. The California Association of Realtors reported that June existing home sales plunged 7.3% from June 2017 and inventory is up 8.1%. A subscriber of the Short Seller’s Journal showed me an email in which Pulte Homes (PHM) was offering up to an unprecedented $20,000 bonus to realtors who sold Pulte homes in new developments in northern Florida.

Housing starts for June reported last Wednesday came in at 1.17 million (SAAR). The Wall Street brain trust was looking for 1.32 million. This was a 12.3% plunge from May.  May’s original report was revised lower. Starts for both single-family and multi-family homes were down sharply across the entire country. If inventory were “low,” housing starts would be soaring, not falling.

I’m sure northern Florida is not the only market in which Pulte is offering large selling bonuses and I’m sure Pulte is not the only homebuilder offering large broker incentives. I look at the inventory numbers across homebuilders every quarter. A lot of the inventory is “work-in-process.” But finished a new home does not necessarily show up in the MLS system unless the builder lists it. This is why, on the surface, new home inventory might look relatively low but the builders are showing huge inventory levels in their SEC-filed financials.

Because of the nature of the asset, and the relative illiquidity of the market relative to actively traded financial assets, change in the direction of the momentum in the housing market is like turning a large ocean-freighter around. The manic phase of the housing bubble is over. The momentum has been turning in the opposite direction since late 2017. Flippers who bought homes in the last 3-6 months will soon become desperate to sell. Some will look to rent and “wait for the market move through this valley and head up again” only find that rental prices in many areas are now below the cost of carry.  They forget to tell you that part in flipper seminars advertised on local radio stations.

Soon the “discount effect” of falling prices will snowball into an avalanche.  If you think this is wrong, take another look at homebuilder stock charts.  The commentary above is partially excerpted from the latest issue of the Short Seller’s Journal.  In this issue I discuss various strategies for building and managing short  positions in the homebuilder stocks in the context of the homebuilder earnings reports due out tomorrow (Thursday, July 26th).  New subscribers get a handful of back-issues, an option trading primer and a copy of my Amazon Dot Con report.