Category Archives: Gold

Negative Rates, Gresham’s Law And A Parabolic Move In Gold

Thomas Gresham observed in the 1500’s that “bad money drives out good.”  The concept applied to gold and silver coins and the value of precious metals metals used in the coins relative to their face value.  Back then silver coins would be debased by replacing some of the silver content with base metals.  Of course, that practice of monetary debasement goes back to ancient Rome.

But the idea applies today in the sense that, as fiat currency continues to be devalued with money printing and artificially low interest rates, those paying attention will begin to convert cash savings into physical gold and silver and use the devalued fiat currency for transactions settlement. This is likely part of the reason the prices of gold and silver are at all-time highs in almost every fiat currency globally.

But I got to thinking about the further imposition of negative rates after absorbing Alasdair Macleod’s must-read essay, “Deeply negative nominal rates are on their way.” In this brilliantly written explanation of the problems with negative rates, Macleod references two working papers from the IMF which address the problem of hoarding cash if commercial banks impose a negative rate on cash balances by “taxing” cash withdrawals. This would be the implementation of negative rate on money held at banks. Money spent electronically would not be taxed like this.

As preposterous as that may seem, if the International Monetary Fund (“IMF”) is publishing working papers which discuss taxing those who attempt to remove cash from the banking system, it likely means implementation of this policy is being considered not only by the IMF but also the BIS.

The imposition of a negative rate policy in the form of a “tax” on cash withdrawals will likely lead eventually to a run on the banks by large depositors, who will “smell” this policy in advance. This cash – or “untaxed good money” – will be removed from the financial system. Currency needed for daily use would remain in the banks and used electronically – this would be the “bad money.”

In a sense, we’re already seeing Gresham’s Law in the sovereign bond market. Large pools of capital are flooding into sovereign bonds as the price of these bonds grinds inexorably higher. It would be absurd to pay a huge premium above face for a bond knowing that if you hold it to maturity you’ll be repaid substantially less than the price you paid for the bond (i.e. a negative return on these bonds held to maturity). So it’s rational to assume that savvy players will eventually sell before the price of the bond is below the price paid.

It’s performance-chasing that gives the investor a better return than simply holding cash if he sells at the right time. The alternative is holding the cash in short term money market type investments which guarantees a negative return. To visualize this dynamic, here’s the price chart of a 100yr Austrian sovereign bond:

As Bloomberg describes it: “this type of debt carries heavy risks. After all, it will only redeem at 100% of its face value (or par) so investors who have bought in at much higher prices would suffer if yields returned to levels seen as recently as the start of this year – and the price of the bond fell. Furthermore, while interest might not be the priority for many investors in ultra-long maturities, the Austrian paper is only yielding 60 basis points currently. That won’t butter many parsnips.”

Again, as I argued above, rationale investors will begin to sell paper like this and look for alternatives. At some point, as the monetary policies of the Central Banks become more totalitarian, rational investors will turn to gold and silver rather than chase bond prices into even more negative territory. Unfortunately for them, institutional investors will be confined to gold and surrogates like GLD and SLV, both of which have seen massive inflows of capital already. But wealthy investors will soon be converting cash into physical gold and silver and safekeeping it outside of the banking system, thereby effectively removing good money – i.e. untaxed large bank deposits – from the system and using gold and silver as wealth preservation assets.

This in will turn into a real gold rush and the prices of gold and silver will go parabolic. To visualize what this will look like, refer to the chart of the 100yr Austrian bond above.

I agree with Alasdair Macleod’s conclusion that deeply negative interest rates will lead to a collapse of fiat currencies – probably not as soon as this year but, then again, a bell won’t ring when it’s time get out of fiat currencies and bank accounts:

Given the rapidity with which the global economy is now declining, we will be lucky if a credit crisis leading to deeply negative nominal rates doesn’t happen this year. The pace at which depositors in the banks then become aware of what is happening to their fiat currency will determine the speed and extent of the currency collapse. 

The Remarkable Resiliency Of Gold And Silver

The price of gold continues to hold up under the enormous selling in the paper derivatives markets on the Comex and LBMA.  This morning’s price attack is a good example:

The chart above shows December paper gold in 5 minute intervals. Typically the price of gold is taken lower leading up to the a.m. London “fix,” in which the “price fix” process is characterized with heavy offerings.  Lately the price bounces after that. And of course there’s the obligatory price-smack when the Comex floor trading commences (8:20 a.m. EST).  Check that box.  Then the “hey can I tell you the good news” item hit the tape about 4 minutes after the NYSE opened.  The hedge fund algos spiked the S&P 500 futures and dumped paper gold.

For the better part of the last 18 years, when this type of “market” action occurs, gold is down for the count. Not only does the initial “fishing line” sell-off hold, but the gold price moves lower throughout the day.  This snap-back action in the gold price after a price attack since early June is unique to the way gold (and silver) has traded over the last 18+ years.

Gold is at or near an all-time high in most fiat paper currencies except the dollar. This summer, however, it would appear that the dollar-based valuation of gold is starting to break the “shackles” of official intervention and is beginning to reflect the underlying fundamentals.  On the assumption that gold can continue to withstand serious efforts to push the price back below $1500 (the net short position in gold futures held by Comex banks is near a record high, for instance), we could see $1600 or higher before Labor Day weekend.

This price-action in gold is being driven by enormous flows of capital into both physical gold and gold “surrogates” or “derivatives.”  Yes, GLD is a derivative of gold – a device used to index the price movement in gold.  The action over the last two months is more remarkable given that the increased excise tax on bullion imports into India has largely stifled import demand beyond what gets smuggled into the country (in excess of 300 tonnes annually).

I have been told my someone who claims to be in a position to know that there’s a buyer of massive amounts of physical gold and silver on every dip in price and that’s what is driving the resiliency of the precious metals.

Make no mistake, even if by chance of a miracle a “trade agreement” is reached between China and the U.S., the underlying economic fundamentals globally have already deteriorated into a recession. And it’s getting worse. It has nothing to do with tariffs.  For the primary cause, research the amount of debt outstanding now vs.  2008…

Moreover, the randomness of unforeseen news events causing sudden market sell-offs and precious metals rallies is starting to occur with greater frequency. This is driving the flight-to-safety move into the precious metals. The mining stocks have lagged relative to the risk-adjusted percentage move since early June in gold and silver. I do not expect that to last for long…

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Is the Federal Reserve losing control of the gold price?

For the majority of the last 20 years, the western Central Banks, under the direction of the BIS, have been able to use the precious metals derivatives markets to “manage” the price of gold.  As long as counterparties who are “synthetically” long gold and silver are willing to settle the derivatives trade in cash or ETF shares, gold derivatives can be created in infinite quantities and used to keep a lid on the price of gold.

But since late spring, it seems that the attempts to use the paper gold and silver markets on the Comex and LBMA to drive the price lower have been met with aggressive buying.  For now the only explanation is that a large buyer  (or maybe several) may be accumulating physical gold/silver, which is preventing the price managers from indiscriminately printing and flooding the market with paper derivative contracts to drive the price down.  The tail may no longer be wagging the dog.

My friend and colleague, Paul Craig Roberts wrote this commentary about the possibility that the physical gold market is taking away:

After years of being kept in the doldrums by orchestrated short selling described on this website by Roberts and Kranzler, gold has lately moved up sharply reaching $1,510 this morning. The gold price has continued to rise despite the continuing practice of dumping large volumes of naked contracts in the futures market. The gold price is driven down but quickly recovers and moves on up. I haven’t an explanation at this time for the new force that is more powerful than the short-selling that has been used to control the price of gold.

You can read the rest of PCR’s analysis here:  Is The Fed Losing Control Of Gold

Inching Toward The Cliff – Why Gold Is Soaring

The global economy is headed uncontrollably toward the proverbial cliff. Although the Central Banks will once again attempt to defer this reality with more money printing and currency devaluation, systemic collapse is fait accompli.

Gold and silver are behaving in a way I have not observed in over 18 years of active participation in the precious metals sector. It’s quite possible that the is being driven by the physical gold and silver markets, with the banks losing manipulative control over precious metals prices using derivatives.

Silver Doctors invited me to discuss a global economy headed for economic and financial disaster; we also discuss the likely reintroduction of gold into the global monetary system:

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You can learn more about  Investment Research Dynamics newsletters by following these links (note: a miniumum subscription period beyond the 1st month is not required):  Short Seller’s Journal subscription information   –   Mining Stock Journal subscription information

A Global Race To Zero In Fiat Currencies…

…ushers in the restoration of price discovery in the precious metals market. The price of gold is at or near an all-time in most currencies except the dollar. This summer, however, it would appear that the dollar-based valuation of gold is starting to break the “shackles” of official intervention and is beginning reflect the underlying fundamentals. Gold priced in dollars is up over 14% since mid-November 2018 and over 44% since it bottomed at $1050 in December 2015. But those RORs for gold are inconvenient truths you won’t hear in the mainstream financial media.

The movement in gold from 2008-2011 reflected the fundamental problems that caused the great financial crisis. The gold price also anticipated the inherent devaluation of the U.S. dollar from the enormous amount of money and credit that was to be created in order to keep the U.S. financial/economic system from collapsing. But those “remedies” only  treated the symptoms – not the underlying problems.

Once the economic/financial system was stabilized, the price of gold – which had become
technically extremely over-extended – entered a 5-year period of correction/consolidation.
This of course was helped along with official intervention. Gold bottomed out vs. the dollar in late 2015. As you can see, the gold price is significantly undervalued relative to the rising level of Treasury debt:

This is just one measuring stick by which to assess a “fundamental” dollar price for gold. But clearly just using this variable, gold is significantly under-priced in U.S. dollars.

As mentioned above, the underlying problems that led to the systemic de facto collapse in 2008 were allowed to persist. In fact, these problems have become worse despite the  efforts of the policy-makers and insider elitists to cover them up. But gold is starting to sniff the truth.  I’ve been expecting an aggressive effort by the banks to push the price of gold below $1400 – at least temporarily. But every attempt at this endeavor has failed quickly.  This is the ”invisible hand” of the market that ”sees” the ensuing currency devaluation race, which has shifted from a marathon to a track meet.

Though the politicians and Wall Street snake-oil salesmen will blame the fomenting economic contraction on the “trade war,”  the system was heading into a tail-spin anyway – the trade war is simply hastening the process. As such, the only conclusion I can draw is that there’s big big money globally – over and above the well publicized Central Bank buying – that is moving into gold and silver for wealth preservation. In short, bona fide price discovery in U.S. dollar terms is being reintroduced to the precious metals market.

The Mining Stock Journal  covers several mining stocks that I believe are extraordinarily undervalued relative to their upside potential. I also present opportunistic recommendations on select mid-tier and large-cap miners that should outperform their peers.  You can learn more about this newsletter here:   Mining Stock Journal information.

Gold / Silver May Be Breaking Free From Manipulation

The price of gold has rejected numerous attempts by the banks to hammer the gold price below $1400 using paper gold derivatives on the Comex and the LBMA. I have not seen gold behave with such resiliency in the last 19 years when the Comex banks have an extremely large short position in Comex paper.

The action in the price of gold is signalling that large buyers are accumulating a lot of physical gold. This is preventing the banks from using the Comex as a manipulative tool. Based on historical preferences, I highly doubt the buying is coming from the hedge funds, who have been content playing in the paper gold sandbox of the Comex.

Per the World Gold Council numbers, which are notoriously understated, Central Banks have purchased 374 tonnes of gold in the first half of 2019. This is the highest level of CB gold purchases in over 50 years. Note that western Central Banks – specifically the Fed, ECB, BoE and BoJ have been notably absent from the buying frenzy. The buying has been led by China, Poland and Russia.

“With governments everywhere itching to increase spending without raising taxes and as the global economy sinks into a trade and credit-cycle induced recession, budget deficits will fuel monetary inflation at a faster pace than seen before. Re-learning that gold is sound money is now the most urgent priority for all those charged with responsibility for other peoples’ investments.”

The quote above is from Alasdair Macleod’s must-read essay titled, “The Reasoning Behind Gold’s Breakout.”  The article dispels the common “Fake news” myths about gold. It would be a great article to read for Warren Buffet, who believes that gold “just sits there doing nothing.” Of course, students of gold and history know that gold has outperformed the Dow since 1971. Macleod revisits the math behind this fact.

If you are looking for mining stock ideas to take advantage of the emerging bull market move in gold and silver, please consider my Mining Stock Journal.  In the latest issue released last night I review a popular silver stock that I believe is overvalued and I present a high risk/high return junior exploration stock that is relatively unknown but has 10x potential. You can learn more about this newsletter here:  Mining Stock Journal information.

Gold, Silver, Mining Stocks Are A Coiled Spring

Currently gold and silver are behaving in a way that I have not seen since late 2008. The gold open interest on the Comex is near a record high (657,776 on July 11, 2016). The Comex banks continue pile into the short side while the hedge funds pile into the long side. However, every attempt to start a “waterfall” type sell-off is met with buying. Several attempts to take gold below $1400 this week have been thwarted. Silver all of sudden started moving higher manically. Based on the data I see daily, India and China are not participating in the buying. At least overtly. It feels like someone “big” is out “there” accumulating gold.

Phil Kennedy of Kennedy Financial put together a roundtable discussion with Bill Murphy, Dave Collum, Rob Kirby and me to discuss our thoughts on the gold market:

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You can learn more about  Investment Research Dynamics newsletters by following these links (note: a miniumum subscription period beyond the 1st month is not required):  Short Seller’s Journal subscription information   –   Mining Stock Journal subscription information

It’s Just A Matter Of Time (before the market tips over again)

Texas Instruments reported its Q2 yesterday after the close.  Revenues were down 9% YoY for Q2 and management forecast an 11% decline for Q3.  The stock market rewarded this fundamental deterioration in TXN’s business model by adding nearly $8 billion to TXN’s valuation as I write this.

The Dow Jones Transports index is up 1% on the news that the U.S. is sending envoys over to Shangai for a face-to-face love-in with their Chinese counterparts to discuss the two Governments’ differences of opinions on how to conduct bi-lateral trade.  The  stock  market momentum chasers are happy because the headline announced that the meeting would “face to face,” therefore it’s a given that the meeting will save the freight industry from the deep recession into which it’s headed.

The U.S.’ economic woes are not caused by the trade war anymore than China’s issues are caused by the trade war.  The trade war is a symptom of the underlying systemic structural issues.  Trump’s handlers crafted a clever strategy to enable the policy-makers and war-mongers of the Deep State to use China and the trade war as a scapegoat.

Fixing the trade differences – which likely won’t happen in any meaningful manner – and taking interest rates to zero will not stimulate economic activity.   The stock market is melting up because the western Central Banks have made money free to use for those closest to the money spigot.  The banks and companies with access to the free money know that investing it in capital formation is a waste of time because real economic activity is contracting.  Instead they plow this cash into the stock market (cheap loans to hedge funds from banks in  lieu of margin credit and corporate share buy-backs).

The real source of the problem is too much debt.  The global financial system is on the precipice  of a Von Mises’ “crack up boom.”  The melt-up in the chip stocks and unicorns is stunningly similar to the melt-up in the same chip stocks and the dot.coms in late 1999/early 2000.  The “unicorn” stocks are this era’s “dot.com stocks.”  Most of the hedge fund managers and daytraders were in grade school during the first tech bubble.  They will remain clueless until the rug  is pulled out from under them.

The stock and housing markets will eventually collapse because the foundation of debt on which both asset markets are propped will implode.  This process of systemic cleansing started in 2008 but was deferred by the trillions in printed money and credit creation thrown at the problem.  Rather than “fixing” the system, the “solution” did nothing more than add gasoline on the underlying fire.

Someone asked me yesterday what triggered the sell-off in tech stocks in early 2000.  I said, “the market started to shit the bed for no specific reason other than it stopped going higher and decided to go south. The Fed jawboning was not nearly as pervasive although Greenspan was good at ‘talking’ stocks higher. The President then never cheered on the stock market like Trump does. At some point, no one can for sure when, this stock market is going tip-over – it’s just a matter of time…”

Tesla, Gold, Silver And A Historical Stock Bubble

“Tesla’s headed for bankruptcy. It’s got a flawed business model; costs are way too high for the price charged for the vehicles and its riddled with accounting fraud. But the regulators will look the other way until it’s too late.”

Silver Liberties invited me on to its podcast to discuss reality. We spend 35 minutes trying to blow away the Orwellian “smoke” that is engulfing the United States’ economic, political system:

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You can learn more about  Investment Research Dynamics newsletters by following these links (note: a miniumum subscription period beyond the 1st month is not required):  Short Seller’s Journal subscription information   –   Mining Stock Journal subscription information

Modern Monetary Theory, Centralized Control And Gold

My friend and colleague, Chris Powell, Treasurer of GATA, wrote a compelling essay on Modern Monetary Theory. MMT has been in operation by the western Central Banks since Bretton Woods. The “QE” program that began in 2008 is the most recent and blatant implementation of MMT. This is a must-read if you are interesting in understanding the hidden mechanism at work that is destroying the United States.

Modern Monetary Theory, which has been getting much attention lately, is so controversial mainly because it is misunderstood. It is misunderstood first because it is not a theory at all but a truism.

That is, MMT holds essentially that a government issuing a currency without a fixed link to a commodity like gold or silver is constrained in its currency issuance only by inflation and devaluation.

This is a very old observation in economics, going back centuries, even to the classical economist Adam Smith, and perhaps first formally acknowledged by the U.S. government with a speech given in 1945 by the chairman of the board of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Beardsley Ruml. The speech was published in 1946.

Ruml said:

“The necessity for a government to tax in order to maintain both its independence and its solvency is true for state and local governments, but it is not true for a national government. Two changes of the greatest consequence have occurred in the last 25 years which have substantially altered the position of the national state with respect to the financing of its current requirements.

“The first of these changes is the gaining of vast new experience in the management of central banks. The second change is the elimination, for domestic purposes, of the convertibility of the currency into gold. Final freedom from the domestic money market exists for every sovereign national state where there exists an institution which functions in the manner of a modern central bank and whose currency is not convertible into gold or into some other commodity.”

Ruml noted that in a fiat currency system such as the United States had adopted by 1945, government did not need to tax to raise revenue but could create as much money as it wanted and deploy it as it thought best, using taxes instead to give value to its currency and implement social and economic policy.

MMT does not claim that the government should create and deploy infinite money. It claims that money can be created and deployed as much as is necessary to improve general living conditions and eliminate unemployment until the currency begins to lose value.

The second big misunderstanding about MMT is that it is not a mere policy proposal but is actually the policy that has been followed by the U.S. government for decades without the candor of Ruml’s 1945 acknowledgment.

The problem with MMT is that, in its unacknowledged practice, it already has produced what its misunderstanding critics fear it for: the creation and deployment of infinite money and credit by central banks as well as vast inflation.

In accordance with MMT, this creation of infinite money and credit has necessitated central banking’s “financial repression” — its suppression of interest rates and commodity prices through both open and surreptitious intervention in bond and futures markets and the issuance of financial derivatives.

That is, since money creation in the current financial system is restrained only by inflation, this restraint can be removed or lessened with certain price controls, which, to be effective, must be disguised, lest people discern that there are no markets anymore, just interventions.

The British economist Peter Warburton perceived this in his 2001 essay, “The Debasement of World Currency — It Is Inflation, But Not As We Know It“:

“What we see at present is a battle between the central banks and the collapse of the financial system fought on two fronts. On one front, the central banks preside over the creation of additional liquidity for the financial system to hold back the tide of debt defaults that would otherwise occur. On the other, they incite investment banks and other willing parties to bet against a rise in the prices of gold, oil, base metals, soft commodities, or anything else that might be deemed an indicator of inherent value.

“Their objective is to deprive the independent observer of any reliable benchmark against which to measure the eroding value not only of the U.S. dollar but of all fiat currencies. Equally, they seek to deny the investor the opportunity to hedge against the fragility of the financial system by switching into a freely traded market for non-financial assets. [EMPHASIS ADDED.]

“Central banks have found the battle on the second front much easier to fight than the first. Last November I estimated the size of the gross stock of global debt instruments at $90 trillion for mid-2000. How much capital would it take to control the combined gold, oil, and commodity markets? Probably no more than $200 billion, using derivatives.

“Moreover, it is not necessary for the central banks to fight the battle themselves, although central bank gold sales and gold leasing have certainly contributed to the cause. Most of the world’s large investment banks have overtraded their capital so flagrantly that if the central banks were to lose the fight on the first front, then the stock of the investment banks would be worthless. Because their fate is intertwined with that of the central banks, investment banks are willing participants in the battle against rising gold, oil, and commodity prices.”

This “financial repression” and commodity price suppression have channeled into financial and real estate assets — the assets of property owners — the vast inflation resulting from the policy of infinite money creation, thereby diverting inflation from assets whose prices are measured by government’s consumer price indexes. Meanwhile those indexes are constantly distorted and falsified to avoid giving alarm.

As a result the ownership class is enriched and the working class impoverished. Of course this is exactly the opposite of what MMT’s advocates intend.

But while the monetary science conceived by MMT people well might develop a formula for operating a perfect monetary system with full employment and prosperity for all, the monetary system always will confer nearly absolute power on its operators, and as long as the operators are human, such power will always corrupt many of them — even MMT’s advocates themselves.

That’s why market rigging is the inevitable consequence of MMT as it is now practiced and why the world is losing its free and competitive markets to monopoly and oligopoly and becoming less democratic and more totalitarian.

So what is the solution?

Maybe some libertarianism would help: Let governments use whatever they want as money, but let individuals do the same and don’t mess with them. Gold, cryptocurrencies, seashells, oxen, whatever — leave them alone.

Most of all, require government to be completely transparent in whatever it does in the markets. If government wants to rig markets, require that it be done in the open and reported contemporaneously.

After all, the world can hardly know where to go when it isn’t permitted to know where it is.