Tag Archives: Netflix

Crashing Auto Sales Reflect Onset Of Debt Armageddon

July auto sales was a blood-bath for U.S auto makers.  The SAAR (Seasonally Manipulated Adjusted Annualized Rate) metric – aka “statistical vomit” –  presented a slight increase for July over June (16.7 SAAR vs 16.5 SAAR).   But the statisticians can’t hide the truth.  GM’s total sales plunged 15% YoY vs an 8% decline expected.  Ford’s sales were down 7.4% vs an expected 5.5% drop.   Chrysler’s sales dropped 10.5% vs. -6.1% expected.  In aggregate, including foreign-manufactured vehicles, sales were down 7% YoY.

Note:  These numbers are compiled by Automotive News based on actual monthly sales reported by manufactures.  Also please note:  A “sale” is recorded when the vehicle is shipped to the dealer.  It does not reflect an economic transaction between a dealer and an end-user.   As Automotive News reports:  “[July was] the weakest showing yet in a year that is on tract to generate the industry’s first decline in volume since the 2008-2009 market collapse.”

The domestics blamed the sharp decline in sales on fleet sales.  But GM’s retail sales volume plunged 14.4% vs its overall vehicle cliff-dive of 15%  And so what?  When the Obama Government, after it took over GM,  and the rental agencies were loading up on new vehicles, the automakers never specifically identified fleet sales as a driver of sales.

What really drove sales was the obscenely permissive monetary and credit policies implemented by the Fed since 2008.  But debt-driven Ponzi schemes require credit usage to expand continuously at an increase rate to sustain itself.   And this is what it did from mid-2010 until early 2017:

Auto sales have been updated through June and the loan data through the end of the Q1. You can see the loan data began to flatten out in Q1 2017.  I suspect it will be either “flatter” or it will be “curling” downward when the Fed gets around to update the data through Q2. You can also see that, since the “cash for clunkers” Government-subsidized auto sales spike up in late 2009, the increase in auto sales since  2010 has been driven by the issuance of debt.

Since the middle of 2010, the amount of auto debt outstanding has increased nearly 60%. The average household has over $29,000 in auto debt.  Though finance companies/banks will not admit it, more than likely close to 40% of the auto loans issued are varying degrees of sub-prime to not rated (sub-sub-prime).  Everyone I know who has taken out an auto loan or lease has told me that they were not asked to provide income verification.

Like all orgies, the Fed’s credit orgy has lost energy and stamina.  The universe of warm bodies available to pass the “fog a mirror” test required to sign auto loan docs is largely tapped out.  The law of diminishing returns has invaded the credit market.  Borrower demand is tapering and default rates are rising.  The rate of borrowing is rolling over and lenders are tightening credit standards – a little, anyway – in response to rising default rates. The 90-day delinquency rate has been rising since 2014 and is at a post-financial crisis high.  The default rates are where they were in 2008, right before the real SHTF.

The graph above shows the 60+ day delinquency rate (left side) and default rate (right side)
for prime (blue line) and subprime (yellow line) auto loans. As you can see, the 60+ day
delinquency rate for subprime auto loans is at 4.51%, just 0.18% below the peak level hit in
2008. The 60+ day delinquency rate for prime auto loans is 0.54%, just 0.28% below the
2008 peak. In terms of outright defaults, subprime auto debt is just a shade under 12%,
which is about 2.5% below its 2008 peak. Prime loans are defaulting at a 1.52% rate, about
200 basis points (2%) below the 2008 peak. However, judging from the rise in the 60+ day
delinquency rate, I would expect the rate of default on prime auto loans to rise quickly this
year.

We’re not in crisis mode yet and the delinquency/default rates on subprime auto debt is near the levels at which it peaked in 2008. These numbers are going to get a lot worse this year and the amount of debt involved is nearly 60% greater. But the real problem will be, once again, the derivatives connected to this debt.

The size of the coming auto loan implosion will not be as large as the mortgage implosion in 2008, but it will likely be accompanies by an implosion in student loan and credit card debt – combined it will likely be just as systemically lethal.   It would be a mistake to expect that this problem will not begin to show up in the mortgage market.

Despite the Dow etc hitting new record highs, many stocks are declining, declining precipitously or imploding.  For insight, analysis and short-sell ideas on a weekly basis,  check out the  Short Seller’s Journal.  The last two issues presented a uniquely in-depth analysis of Netflix and Amazon and why they are great shorts now.

The Accounting Ponzi Scheme Is Catching Up To Amazon

“‘Faith’ is defined as “belief without evidence.” AMZN is a stock investment that thrives on
investor faith. Investor greed transforms into irrational faith when the faith is rewarded with stock gains. This will ultimately burn out but it’s impossible to predict timing. The stock is trading at 178x TTM net income. This is an insane multiple for a company with a deteriorating business model that is under attack from all angles by large, well-capitalized competitors who specialize in Amazon’s business segments.

Having said that, I continue to believe that money can be made trading AMZN from the short side but it requires discipline and diligent capital management. Amazon is one of those stocks in which you need to maintain some short exposure because, when it finally goes, it will go quickly and you’ll be waiting for a big bounce to short that will never materialize” – excerpt from the latest Short Seller’s Journal

In last week’s issue of the Short Seller’s Journal, I did an in-depth analysis of Netflix’s (NFLX) accounting and demonstrated how NFLX manipulates GAAP accounting to manufacture fake net income. I advised subscribers to short NFLX on Monday at $188. This week I focus on the key areas of Amazon’s quarterly financials and show how Jeff Bezos transforms actual negative free cash flow into the Bezos $9.6 billion LTM “free cash flow.”

I also demonstrate the ways in which Amazon’s business model is beginning to break down – that it’s e-commerce model is under attack from all angles by well-capitalized, more profitable retailers like Walmart and its cloud computing business is being attacked aggressively by traditional software development and applications companies like MSFT, IBM, GOOG and ORCL.

On a year over year LTM basis, the amount of cash burned by AMZN has increased 89.2%, from negative $2.476 billion to negative $4.685 billion. – this seek’s Short Seller’s Journal shows why this statement is fact. Recently subscribers have cleaned up on Chipotle (CMG), Sears (SHLD), Beazer (BZH) and others. This week’s issue shows why AMZN will eventually be a home run short. You can learn more here: Short Seller’s Journal info.

Netflix And Amazon: Case Studies In Accounting Games

Over the time since I started the Short Seller’s Journal, several subscribers have asked about Netflix (NFLX). For some reason I have refrained from presenting it as a short idea, instead choosing AMZN and TSLA as my insanely overvalued “tech poison” short-sell ideas. However, knowing that NFLX was reporting this week, I decided what if – and really more like when – it spiked up on a headline “beat,” I would take a close look at the numbers to see what’s going on with NFLX accounting. Sifting through NFLX’s web of accounting chicanery took a lot longer than I anticipated…

As I expected, I found a company that pushes the envelope in an area of GAAP accounting in which there is substantial “grey” area that enables companies like NFLX to manufacture and manage reported GAAP net income. But NFLX bleeds cash, as I’ll show. The quote at the top summarizes the NFLX business model: it will burn cash “for many years.”

In a sense, NFLX is similar to a Ponzi scheme. As long as cash received in the form of revenues and stock or bond financing exceeds cash expense outflows each year, it can continue operating. But as soon as revenues decline or the capital markets refuse to give NFLX money, it will collapse. As you will see below, while NFLX is generating growth in its net income, the amount of cash burned by its operations has been increasing dramatically. And it has been financing this cash flow deficit with debt.

The above narrative is from last week’s Short Seller’s Journal. I walked through the areas in which NFLX exploits grey areas in GAAP accounting rules to manipulate the cash flows from its business model (cash revenues minus actual cash expenses) in order present GAAP net income. The primary lever it uses is the guidelines (note: “guidelines” – not “rules”) for depreciating media capex. I show step-by-step how NFLX exploited the grey areas in GAAP to manufacture the $0.15 earnings per share it reported.

I also discussed strategies for shorting NFLX, which included shorting the stock outright and using puts. Subscribers who shorted NFLX on Monday morning this past week are green on their short positions. I also suggested capital management strategies.

This week I will be showing how to dissect the numbers AMZN must disclose in the footnotes to its 10-Q filing to see what’s really going on beneath the Jeff Bezos show. For instance Bezos opens his earnings presentation every quarter with a slide and a discussion of the “Free Cash Flow” produced my AMZN on an LTM basis. It’s the very first slide in the earnings call slide show. He’s now claiming LTM FCF of $9.7 billion.

BUT in the footnotes to the 10-Q – a place where no Wall Street analyst ever dares to venture, assuming they even know the footnotes exist – there’s a disclosure that explains that Jeff Bezos FCF is not GAAP FCF. Using GAAP, the Bezos FCF is reduced to $4.1 billion. I’m using ETIDA minus Capex minus Capital Lease Amortization payments. I even give him the benefit of adding back the non-cash share compensation portion of salary, which technically is not allowed in GAAP because share dilution is a form of cash use ultimately from the shareholders perspective. The $4.1 billion is GAAP free cash flow, not the Bezos bullshit FCF.

And not only that, but the AMZN core business model is starting to break down. But that analysis will be saved for this week’s Short Seller’s Journal.   Subscribers to the SSJ also get 50% off a subscription to the Mining Stock Journal.   Click here to learn more about the SSJ:   Short Seller’s Journal info.

Dave, just a moment for some feed back. I just placed and order for 1 oz gold eagles thanks to my profits off Tesla and BBBY. Thanks, as always. – Subscriber email received in early July